Category Archives: Guest Posts

Loving Jesus

With the Easter season upon us, as a Christian Scientist I have been giving extra thought to why I love Jesus.

And with that in mind, I’d like to share here, for my readers, this thoughtful piece by a colleague of mine – Tim Mitchinson from Naperville, Illinois – who expressed it so well, sharing how he has found his love for Jesus to be very practical.

Writing in the Peoria Journal Star, he says succinctly – and knowing Tim,  sincerely – “I love Jesus.

Tim Mitchinson (Photo courtesy of Tim Mitchinson)

He continues, “…I stand in wonderment of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection as actual events that have great meaning for all of us today.”

He shares how he has found meaning from this in personal growth and in service,  becoming more forgiving, with healing bringing a return to health.

His last paragraph summarizes it all very nicely, and his article is a wonderful “read” at this Easter season, which I heartily recommend.

Click the title to read this article: Loving Jesus

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Remembering the “thankful TO” part

Here’s a thoughtful piece from Health writer and colleague Eric Nelson of Petaluma, California, writing about what he’s thankful FOR and what he’s thankful TO.

(©Glowimages/stock photo)
(©Glowimages/stock photo)

 

Thanksgiving: An attitude of gratitude that inspires health

It was a moment that literally stopped me in my tracks.

Eric Nelson
Eric Nelson

As I was walking through San Diego’s Balboa Park — the Spreckels organ pavilion to my back, the Museum of Art to my front — I found myself suddenly overcome by an almost overwhelming rush of gratitude…

Even better than having so many things to be thankful for, however, was having something to be thankful to.

Read the entire article on Communities Digital News here:
Thanksgiving: An attitude of gratitude that inspires health 

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GUEST POST: Adult autistics – are they doomed to solitude?

Here’s a very thoughtful article by my colleague Karla Hackney published earlier this week in the Oregonian.

Karla Hackney (picture courtesy of Karla Hackney)
Karla Hackney (picture courtesy of Karla Hackney)

Seldom heard are the stories of autistic adults.  And rarely do they report the challenges of those who seek companionship. It’s believed that autism blocks the ability to intercommunicate and express feelings in a normal way.  These difficulties often relegate those diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to solitude.  And yet, like us all, those diagnosed as on the Spectrum deeply wish to love another.

We may think of our own relationships as pertaining to the heart, but for solutions in the field of ASD, research has focused predominantly on the brain.

Click here to read the rest of the article…

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Christian Scientists gather in Boston at denomination’s annual meeting; ponder the relevance of church

By:  Richard Evans, Manager, Christian Science Committees on Publication

Boston, MA — When Christian Scientists convened in Boston, Massachusetts, Monday, June 6, for the annual meeting of their denomination, they faced a question that many mainline Christian churches also confront: can church be relevant today?

CS church edifice with attribution

Their perspective on this question—as on just about everything else—runs counter to the popular narrative. “There’s a universal hunger for the heartfelt experience of God’s saving power,” said Margaret Rogers, chairwoman of the five-member lay board of directors of the Church of Christ, Scientist, which has its worldwide headquarters in Boston. “The demand,” she said, is for a church “that is vibrant with unselfed love and actively engaged in authentic Christian healing for humanity.”

For most Christian Scientists, this doesn’t seem to mean better outreach or new ministries and programs. It means drilling down on the thing they feel they bring to the world: spiritual healing, based on the teachings of Christ Jesus, that is expected to be both humane in spirit and effective in results. “We pray,” explained another director, Allison W. Phinney, “because prayer aligns us with how things really work. It lets us see and feel more of the immense good and the divine Love that’s actually here for us and for humanity.”

Founded 137 years ago by religious leader Mary Baker Eddy, the Christian Science Church is a Christian denomination based on the Bible. While relatively small in numbers, the denomination has branch churches in more than 60 countries and has had an outsized impact on Christian thought by its insistence that God’s goodness brings not only salvation from sin, but healing of illness and suffering.

The group’s diversity is seen among some of the new officers announced at the meeting. The new church president is Annu Matthai of Bangalore, India. The new First Reader—who conducts Sunday worship and Wednesday testimony meetings at The Mother Church in Boston—is Louis E. Benjamin of Hillcrest, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The new Second Reader is Diane Uttley Marrapodi of Forest Hill, Maryland, USA. Many church members travelled to Boston for Monday’s proceedings, while more followed the meetings live online.

The theme of this year’s meeting—“Church: ‘healing and saving the world’”—comes from Mary Baker Eddy’s view that Christ Jesus’ original Christianity has deep relevance for the world and its future, and that church must be a practical force for good in daily lives, bringing hope and spiritual progress for humanity. One small symbol of this is the planned renewal of the Christian Science plaza in Boston’s Back Bay. The outdoor spaces surrounding The Mother Church will be updated to better benefit the community as an environmentally sustainable oasis in the midst of the city. A longer-term commitment of the denomination has been publication of The Christian Science Monitor, an international news outlet providing daily and weekly news, online and in print—news that is intended to bring light, rather than heat, to the important issues of the day.

Members at the meeting reported on activities in their regions, as well as provided examples of healing from around the world.

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Finding deeper meaning when asking, “Are green spaces healing spaces?”

Karla Hackney, writing in Hillsboro Patch in Oregon, probes how treks in green spaces can be more deeply healing.

The author really caught my attention when she referred to a friend’s pilgrimage in Spain on the Camino de Santiago trail.

Recently, I enjoyed watching a movie entitled, “The Way“, in which the main character, played by Martin Sheen, hikes this trail when he goes to Spain to claim the body of his estranged son, who was killed while hiking the same trail.

On this trail, Hackney’s friend finds deeper meaning in favorite Bible verses and with this comes freedom from infection and pain.  Hackney includes a link to a 7 minute audio account by her friend.

Houses on hillside in Spain (©Glowimages/stock photo)
Houses on hillside in Spain (©Glowimages/stock photo)

Another friend reached out “for a connection with God’s infinite love” while summiting Mount Washington.

Hackney says, “In hiking, the important part is to ‘summit,’ to get to that place where, in our heart, we rise above everyday challenges and we don’t allow information from the five physical senses to cloud the pinnacle of God’s beautiful, spiritual creation. We don’t have to locate ourselves in a forest before we can find spiritual peace!”

A touching and helpful article, worth reading.

To read it, click title: Are green spaces healing spaces?
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A better solution to depression than a walk in the park

Wendy Margolese (Picture courtesy of Wendy Margolese)
Wendy Margolese (Picture courtesy of Wendy Margolese)

Health writer Wendy Margolese of Ontario, Canada, writing in SIMCOE News, says, “I am not saying that nature isn’t a wonderful experience, but I’m circumspect of health solutions that end up making me dependent on a person, a place or a potion.”

She offers a way to go further/higher and includes a wonderful example in which a woman used that approach and found freedom from Postpartum depression.

If you’re struggling with depression, you might find these ideas helpful.

Read her article here:
A better solution to depression than a walk in the park

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For Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

(Photo: Bob Cummings)
(Photo: Bob Cummings)

“On the night before his assassination, Martin Luther King said in a speech in Memphis, “We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn’t matter with me now. Because I’ve been to the mountaintop…”

Self-syndicated health columnist Tim Mitchinson in Illinois, writing on Fit for Life, applies this idea of a mountaintop view to taking a higher, broader view of freedom that includes freedom from disease – aka health!

A timely article I highly recommend: The mountaintop of health.

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PTSD: Hopeful new treatment approach that looks beyond physical symptoms

120-CR64QQ-Soldier-holding-rifleVeterans suffering from PTSD deserve effective help.

“The need for non-drug treatment options is a significant and urgent public health imperative,” says NCCIH Director Josephine Briggs, MD.

Urgent, because the need for cure is growing, and also because conventional drug treatments aren’t working over the long haul.

This excerpt comes from a thoughtful and helpful Arlington, Virginia Patch article by Richard Geiger, who follows the VA’s search for non-drug PTSD treatment of symptoms.

Geiger looks at how the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) are focusing treatment on individuality.

He also looks at lessons learned from the experience of Col. (Ret) Janet Horton, a Christian Science U.S. Army Chaplain, one of the first female chaplains ever called into active duty. She found it unproductive to try to work directly with symptoms at all. Instead, she focused on the individual’s untouched spiritual identity.

This really is a “must read”:  PTSD Treatment: Symptoms or Souls?

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Guest post: Thinking of suicide? Take your troubles to God.

120-FEDRWLR4R Teen on stepsMy colleague Valerie Minard, writing in Collingswood Patch in New Jersey, shared some helpful ideas when dealing with suicidal thoughts.

Excerpts:

“But what about the teens who suffer in silence or are not ready to turn to a teen suicide prevention group or trusted adult? I can’t answer for others but in my case, I found my connection to the Divine was a life saver during a time when I felt there was no one in whom to confide.”

“The ideas that saved me went along these lines…”

  • “These negative thoughts are not your thoughts. They are lies about your worth and purpose for existing, and you don’t need to listen to them. The ideas God gives you are good. Destructive thoughts are not good. The Bible says, “‘For I know what I have planned for you,’ says the LORD. ‘I have plans to prosper you, not to harm you. I have plans to give you a future filled with hope.’””

For more ideas, read the entire article: Thinking of suicide? Take your troubles to God.

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A Christmas Gift of Forgiveness

(©Glowimages/stock photo)
(©Glowimages/stock photo)

“As we decide what to give to others for Christmas this year, why not consider the gift of forgiveness?”

This from friend and colleague Tim Mitchinson writing in the Peoria Journal-Star in Illinois about the benefits – including to health – of forgiveness.

He quotes Christian healer Mary Baker Eddy, who met wrongs with kindness and forgiveness and said, “I would enjoy taking by the hand all who love me not, and saying to them, ‘I love you, and would not knowingly harm you.’ Because I thus feel, I say to others: Hate no one; for hatred is a plague-spot that spreads its virus and kills at last…If you have been badly wronged, forgive and forget…”

Mitchinson says, “Let’s bring more peace and health on earth, by giving the gift of forgiveness this holiday season.”

A nice article at Christmas time or anytime: Give the gift of forgiveness.

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