Tag Archives: health

Remembering the “thankful TO” part

Here’s a thoughtful piece from Health writer and colleague Eric Nelson of Petaluma, California, writing about what he’s thankful FOR and what he’s thankful TO.

(©Glowimages/stock photo)
(©Glowimages/stock photo)

 

Thanksgiving: An attitude of gratitude that inspires health

It was a moment that literally stopped me in my tracks.

Eric Nelson
Eric Nelson

As I was walking through San Diego’s Balboa Park — the Spreckels organ pavilion to my back, the Museum of Art to my front — I found myself suddenly overcome by an almost overwhelming rush of gratitude…

Even better than having so many things to be thankful for, however, was having something to be thankful to.

Read the entire article on Communities Digital News here:
Thanksgiving: An attitude of gratitude that inspires health 

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GUEST POST: Adult autistics – are they doomed to solitude?

Here’s a very thoughtful article by my colleague Karla Hackney published earlier this week in the Oregonian.

Karla Hackney (picture courtesy of Karla Hackney)
Karla Hackney (picture courtesy of Karla Hackney)

Seldom heard are the stories of autistic adults.  And rarely do they report the challenges of those who seek companionship. It’s believed that autism blocks the ability to intercommunicate and express feelings in a normal way.  These difficulties often relegate those diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to solitude.  And yet, like us all, those diagnosed as on the Spectrum deeply wish to love another.

We may think of our own relationships as pertaining to the heart, but for solutions in the field of ASD, research has focused predominantly on the brain.

Click here to read the rest of the article…

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A better solution to depression than a walk in the park

Wendy Margolese (Picture courtesy of Wendy Margolese)
Wendy Margolese (Picture courtesy of Wendy Margolese)

Health writer Wendy Margolese of Ontario, Canada, writing in SIMCOE News, says, “I am not saying that nature isn’t a wonderful experience, but I’m circumspect of health solutions that end up making me dependent on a person, a place or a potion.”

She offers a way to go further/higher and includes a wonderful example in which a woman used that approach and found freedom from Postpartum depression.

If you’re struggling with depression, you might find these ideas helpful.

Read her article here:
A better solution to depression than a walk in the park

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For Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

(Photo: Bob Cummings)
(Photo: Bob Cummings)

“On the night before his assassination, Martin Luther King said in a speech in Memphis, “We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn’t matter with me now. Because I’ve been to the mountaintop…”

Self-syndicated health columnist Tim Mitchinson in Illinois, writing on Fit for Life, applies this idea of a mountaintop view to taking a higher, broader view of freedom that includes freedom from disease – aka health!

A timely article I highly recommend: The mountaintop of health.

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PTSD: Hopeful new treatment approach that looks beyond physical symptoms

120-CR64QQ-Soldier-holding-rifleVeterans suffering from PTSD deserve effective help.

“The need for non-drug treatment options is a significant and urgent public health imperative,” says NCCIH Director Josephine Briggs, MD.

Urgent, because the need for cure is growing, and also because conventional drug treatments aren’t working over the long haul.

This excerpt comes from a thoughtful and helpful Arlington, Virginia Patch article by Richard Geiger, who follows the VA’s search for non-drug PTSD treatment of symptoms.

Geiger looks at how the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) are focusing treatment on individuality.

He also looks at lessons learned from the experience of Col. (Ret) Janet Horton, a Christian Science U.S. Army Chaplain, one of the first female chaplains ever called into active duty. She found it unproductive to try to work directly with symptoms at all. Instead, she focused on the individual’s untouched spiritual identity.

This really is a “must read”:  PTSD Treatment: Symptoms or Souls?

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Expectancy and Health

120-Y99J36Q5L3R-2-girl-and-a-horse-attribExpectancy, when it connects to the power of God, can do more than sustain us emotionally; it can help heal us physically.

Read more about how expectancy benefits health in my first post on a relatively new social media platform called IdeaPod: Expectation for Good Health.

To read the full-length version of this article published in The News-Herald: Click here.

And to read the Midland Daily News article cited, that contains Autumn Hampton’s wonderful story of recovery from a traumatic brain injury: Click here.

So shall the knowledge of wisdom be unto thy soul: when thou hast found it, then there shall be a reward, and thy expectation shall not be cut off.”~Proverbs 24:14 (KJV)

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A Christmas Gift of Forgiveness

(©Glowimages/stock photo)
(©Glowimages/stock photo)

“As we decide what to give to others for Christmas this year, why not consider the gift of forgiveness?”

This from friend and colleague Tim Mitchinson writing in the Peoria Journal-Star in Illinois about the benefits – including to health – of forgiveness.

He quotes Christian healer Mary Baker Eddy, who met wrongs with kindness and forgiveness and said, “I would enjoy taking by the hand all who love me not, and saying to them, ‘I love you, and would not knowingly harm you.’ Because I thus feel, I say to others: Hate no one; for hatred is a plague-spot that spreads its virus and kills at last…If you have been badly wronged, forgive and forget…”

Mitchinson says, “Let’s bring more peace and health on earth, by giving the gift of forgiveness this holiday season.”

A nice article at Christmas time or anytime: Give the gift of forgiveness.

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Hieroglyphs and The Reflection in the Lake

(©Glowimages/stock photo)
(©Glowimages/stock photo)

Hieroglyphs, those pictorial characters that the Egyptians used for language, were the way Mary Baker Eddy, 19th century pioneer in spirituality and health, described flowers. She said, “The floral apostles are hieroglyphs of Deity.”

What an interesting connection. Flowers communicate – or picture – to us something about Deity. In their beauty, color and symmetry we see something of Deity’s expertise as Creator. In the tenderness of their petals, each in its place, we may see Deity’s tender care for creation.

Similarly, other pictures found in nature or portrayed in artwork may draw thought to the nature of Deity and His creation.

And it turns out that this is beneficial to our health.

Eddy explains, “…the right understanding of Him restores harmony.” And the Bible puts it this way: “Acquaint now thyself with him, and be at peace.”

Now picture this. Years ago, I was visiting my childhood home to help care for my mother who was ill and immobile. Once, while others cared for her, I walked down to the nearby lake, walked out on the dock and sat down on a bench there. Winter was yielding to spring. I was alone. It was mid-day but the water was perfectly still with a stillness usually reserved for the early morning or evening hours.

Looking around the lake, I was struck by how everything on land above the shoreline was perfectly reflected in the water. Hold on to this, and I’ll come back to it in a moment.

This summer, I visited the Healing Arts Gallery at MidMichigan Health in Midland while it was displaying artwork by Jennifer Cook of Herron, Michigan. Her abstract paintings and terracotta pots are full of bright and warm colors that encourage, inspire, and comfort.

It’s interesting to me how her artwork communicates something about Deity, as in her painting entitled, “God Heals and is the God of Restoration.”

Also interesting is how the very process of painting the artwork involved learning more of spiritual things. According to the Gallery’s flyer, Cook found that as she allowed God “to guide each stroke and choose each color” she gained “insight to greater freedom and spirituality.”

Painting #001 in the Gallery especially piqued my interest. It is entitled, “God loves you! He made you. You have a purpose!!! Embrace it!” It is a painting of a person standing on the shore of a small lake out in the woods, surrounded by trees, with sunshine coming through, and the trees – and the clouds above them – reflected in the lake.

Naturally, it reminded me of my earlier experience. The reflection I saw in the lake moved me to ponder the connection that I have – that we all have – with the Divine, with Deity. I thought of the Biblical statement that God made man in His own image and likeness – or, in other words, as His reflection. All around the lake, with each house and each tree, I could see the exact likeness that the reflection in the lake had to its original on land.

It was clear to me that there is a similar relationship between Deity and all of His reflection – all of us. Each of us is really an individual exact likeness expressing His qualities, such as beauty, tenderness, goodness, life, and health.

This reflection in the lake acted as a hieroglyph that conveyed to me a deeper understanding of Deity. This reduced stress and anxiety, enabling me to better care for my mother. And my mother, who was receiving prayer-based spiritual treatment and learning more of Deity herself, improved and was able to get about on her own again.

It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words. If hieroglyphs such as these lead to better health, then perhaps they warrant our attention.

Note: this article was first published in print in The Midland Daily News August 3, 2014.

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When Unconditional Love Reaches a Soldier Suffering PTSD

(@Glowimages/Stock photo)
(@Glowimages/Stock photo)

There’s a reason they’re called man’s best friend.

If you’ve ever had a dog, then you already know something about dogs’ unconditional love. This warrants considering more deeply the divine source and nature of love and its healing power.

Linda Ross C.S. (Picture courtesy of Linda Ross)
Linda Ross C.S. (Picture courtesy of Linda Ross)

Health blogger Linda Ross in Connecticut shares a touching account on LinkedIn of a dog’s unconditional love reaching a soldier suffering with PTSD. It gives a glimpse into unconditional love’s ability to reach below the surface and melt away “difficult memories”. We might also consider how we all have a “divine friendship” with divine Love.

A touching article: Has unconditional love gone to the dogs?

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